Extract from the Worcester Herald – Saturday, 28 February 1891

BAPTIST MISSION ROOM AT RED HILL, WORCESTER

Yesterday the foundation stone of the Mission Hall which is being built by the Baptists of Worcester at Red Hill was laid by Captain Alexander Locke. The afternoon was beautifully fine and a number of the congregation were present. Amongst these were the new pastor (the Rev Forbes Jackson) and Mrs Jackson, Captain Locke, Mrs Larkworthy, the Misses Larkworthy, Mrs Giles, Mrs Temple Bourne, Messrs E.P. Evans, J.S. Hanson, J. French, W.R. Cosford, Ebenezer Baylis, Jabez Swannell, J.G. Harlow, Heath, C. Burden, S. Darby, J. Jones, A.J. Allbutt, W.L. Frost and Mrs Frost.

Captain Alexander Locke, in addressing the gathering, said: ‘The year before last, the 25th anniversary of the building of our church, the friends thought this a good opportunity to raise £1,000 for building a small hall here costing about £450; also to build seven classrooms by the side of our present school in Sansome Walk and to pay off £100 now owing to the incidental fund. I consider this is a very suitable way on our part to celebrate the 25th anniversary and I am sure the citizens of Worcester will think that too. I will conclude by congratulating the teachers and friends meeting here on the Sabbath that they now will be sheltered from the rain and cold of winter, which they were not in the wooden one just removed.’

Captain Locke then laid the stone, which was inscribed: ‘This stone was laid by Captain Alexander Locke, February 26th 1891.’

Mr E.P. Evans said ‘he was very pleased to be present, for the Baptists were the friends of all in that locality and the enemies of none. It was a most difficult matter for parents even in the best-regulated families to get their children together and instruct them in the old, old story of the Gospel in their homes. But in the schools they were classed together according to age and knowledge and the teachers attended week after week to instruct them. The people round should appreciate this self-sacrifice and they should send their children regularly to be instructed in the school which they were building.’  He congratulated Captain Locke on the way in which he had discharged his duties; and he hoped the blessing of God would rest on the structure.

A collection was then taken amounting to £15-12s-4½d including 10s contributed by the children attending the Sunday School.